Mid-Term Blog

While reviewing my previous blog posts, I noticed that I often wrote about how the characters’ actions and behaviors affected the outcome of each of the plays.

In my first blog post, The Social Class Divide, I wrote about how Christopher Sly and the Lord differed throughout the play based on social class differences. My main focal point of this blog captured that the Lord had all the power and Christopher Sly was mocked and ridiculed based on his low social class. I believe that this blog post was my worst out of the other blogs because I was not confident about the topic I was writing about. It was also my first blog that I have ever written so I wasn’t sure what was expected of me in this post. I set up this blog post more like an essay without exploring my own opinions and ideas. I was not sure what blogs looked like, which is why I often used the term “I believe”. However, after reviewing this post, I realized that I could have done much better with this blog if I stated questions that reflected my opinions instead of stating what “I believed”. This would have set up more room for me to discuss and it also would have raised major questions instead of restating the facts that were discovered throughout the play.

In my second blog post, Tragic Young Love, I wrote about Romeo and Juliet’s naïve love and how it resulted in a tragic ending. Throughout this blog post, I used many details and quotations that explored my question stating, “Did the young love between the couple lead to the tragic ending”. I believe this post improved from my first post because I stated the question that I was exploring and answered my own question using evidence from the play. This made my blog post more interesting and easier to understand compared to my first post. Although my second post was much better than my first post, I still think I have a lot of room for improvements. I need to learn how to improve my language while speaking about plays. Sometimes I struggle with what I should be writing about, which often leads to a weaker blog post. In order to improve on my blog posts, I need to feel more confident and comfortable writing in this style.

My third blog post, Motive to Steal the Crown, was my strongest so far. In this post I wrote about how Bolingbroke’s original plan was to steal the crown from Richard II. I used many details throughout this play that reflected my opinions about Bolingbroke’s original motive. I believe that this post was my strongest because I was able to include more opinions about the play by using supporting evidence to back up my opinions. I also thought that I wrote this post using better vocabulary and language that enhanced what I was discussing. After re-reading this post, I can see that I still need to improve stylistic elements of my writing, which I think will improve my grade on the blogs.

At the beginning of the semester, I did not enjoy writing blog posts. I thought it was difficult because this style of writing is different than anything else I had to write throughout college. However, the blog posts grew on me over time. By the second blog post, I enjoyed writing the blogs. I thought that the blogs were a good way to state my own feelings about the plays that we read. I also enjoy that I can read other students’ blog posts because it further allows me to analyze my own thinking related to the plays. It also allows me to see what my classmates are thinking while reading the plays, which allows me to further understand the plays. I believe that the blog posts are perfect for this class because they are more enjoyable to write and I learn more from writing and reading them.

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